ISPO

Published in Cancer Detection and Prevention 2002; 26(2).

Cervical cancer screening among Chinese Americans

Victoria M. Taylor MD, MPHa,b, J. Carey Jackson MD, MA, MPHc,d, Shin-Ping Tu MD, MPHc,d, Yutaka Yasui PhDa, Stephen M. Schwartz PhDa,e, Alan Kuniyuki MSa, Elizabeth Acorda BAa, Kathy Linc, Gregory Hislop MD, MScf

a Division of Public Health Services, Fred Hutchinson Cancer research, Seattle, WA, USA b Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA cDepartment of Medicine, University of Washington, Seanle, WA, USA d International Medicine Clinic, Harborview Medical Center; Seattle, WA, USA e Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA f Cancer Control Research, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouvel; Canada

Accepted 12 February 2002

Study purpose: Chinese women in North America have high rates of invasive cervical cancer and low levels of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing use. This study examined Pap testing barriers and facilitators among Chinese American women. Basic procedures: A community-based, in-person survey of Chinese women was conducted in Seattle, Washington during 1999. Four hundred and thirty-two women in the 20-79 years age-group were included in this analysis. The main outcome measures were a history of at least one previous Pap smear and Pap testing within the last 2 years. Main findings: Nineteen percent of the respondents had never received cervical cancer screening and 36% had not been screened in the previous 2 years. Eight characteristics were independently associated with a history of at least one Pap smear: being married, thinking Pap testing is necessary for sexually inactive women, lack of concerns about embarrassment or cancer being discovered, having received a physician or family recommendation, having obtained family planning services in North America, and having a regular provider. The following characteristics were independently associated with recent screening: thinking Pap testing is necessary for sexually inactive women, lack of concern about embarrassment, having received a physician recommendation, having obtained obstetric services in North America, and having a regular provider. Principal conclusions: Pap testing levels among the study respondents were well below the National Cancer Institute's Year 2000 goals. The findings suggest that cervical cancer control interventions for Chinese are more likely to be effective if they are multifaceted.

KEY WORDS: Chinese Americans, Cervical cancer, Papanicolaou testing.

http://www.cancerprev.org/Journal/Issues/26/2/3901